Don’t love your kitchen backsplash? Maybe your colors have changed but it just isn’t in the picture to redo the backsplash?

You should consider painting it. Trust me. You’ll LOVE it.

Let me walk you through why and how we did ours and hopefully by the end of this you’ll be feeling confident(ish) to go for it yourself!

Why We Painted Our Tile Backsplash

One of my favorite things about this house is the kitchen. However, over time we have converted the golden and beige walls to grey and the gold backsplash was clashing with the rest of the house. But, life happens. Our back door really needs to be replaced and the money needs to go towards that right now. We also aren’t going to replace the countertops now. So, I researched painting tile. To be honest, I have been hesitant to do this for awhile. When you paint furniture, you can usually sand it and restain if you don’t like. But with the tile, I wasn’t sure. After looking for a few different tutorials (all being similar but not the same), I came up with my own plan. Spoiler…it cuts out an extra step which saves time. And all of the mamas said…AMEN!

Total fail on my end but I didn’t get a ton of before pics. Here are a few glimpses of the tile before I started.

 

The Tools Needed For This Project

Here is what I used. For those of you that like the “why” behind it, I’ll explain that too. If you don’t like the why, just buy all the things and trust me.

  1. Zinsser Primer. Find it here or at your local hardware store. I’ve even seen at Walmart. Get the one with red on the front. It is a Shellac based primer. You don’t need the big can. The small one should do for this project.
  2. Sherwin Williams Urethane Trim Paint. The color I used is Dover White. I got the Satin finish. It is not super shiny. To me is seems between a flat and satin. You also don’t need the big can for this. The smaller one should do. I have the big can because I also used this same paint and color for our kitchen cabinets. ***WHY THIS PAINT? This is where you save a step. This paint as a urethane built into it so you don’t have to apply an additional clear coat of anything to seal and protect. LOVE IT!
  3. Brush for primer-basic economy (the cheapo kind) brush. I used a 2 inch. You can find these just about anywhere.
  4. Brush for the paint-I like this one. It is a 2 inch, stiff, angled brush. This is just my personal preference. Use whatever is the most comfortable for you. This will be your main paint brush for this project.
  5. Painter’s Tape. Frog tape is my favorite! I used up what I had in the garage this time so I wasn’t able to do frog tape for the entire project.

Let’s Get Started!

Prep Work

Roll your sleeves up and let’s get started.

Clean your tile up with warm water. Don’t clean with TSP. The shellac primer and TSP aren’t friends.

My assistant helped me with this step.

Now tape off where needed. This part is so tedious but stick with it. I think I just made a joke there. Get it? Tape is sticky? Ok, moving on. As you can tell from the pics, I forgot to take a pic before I primed. Also, Millie had a few strategic places for the tape. She’s a DIYer in training.

Time To Prime

The shellac primer is very runny. It is an alcohol based primer and dries very fast. I dry brushed it on. If you have never done this, that just means you only get a tiny bit of primer on your brush and dab the excess off onto a paper towel.

It will not look pretty. Just keep going. Like I said, it dries fast, so by the time you are done, you should be ready to move onto the painting step.

Time to Paint

I wanted my tile to have more of an industrial look, similar to old painted brick. Because of this, I chose to not completely paint into every crack of the grout. I just took the brush and brushed flat against the tiles. If it got into the grout, great. But it it didn’t, I just went with it. So far I’m liking this look. If I decide to go fill the grout in later with paint, that is easy enough.

Just like with the primer, the first coat won’t look pretty. I ended up doing 3 full coats and a 4th touch up coat in places where the paint still looked thin.

How many coats you do just depends on your personal preference and you can always decide as you go. Even with 4 coats, it did not take a lot of paint to get the job done. 

You can see in this pic that the paint still looks a little translucent. I went on to the next few coats to get the final look I wanted. Read the can of paint also, but I waited at least 4 hours between coats. Even though it may be dry to the touch sooner, you want to let it do it’s thing before you start your next coat.

Voila! The After

If you’ve been hesitant or stuck with your backsplash, I hope this helps give you the courage to go for it! Paint is such an inexpensive way to make big changes.

Do you love this urethane paint? I also used it on the inside of our front door here. 🙂

 

Joyfully Restored